wonderful Nature

In the southern region of Nepal, the jungles of Chitwan National Park await you with wildlife experiences like no other. Go in search of the majestic Royal Bengal tiger and watch the Greater one-horned rhinoceros roam free, while the great Asiatic elephants move about the jungles in herds.  Chitwan National Park is the closest and the ideal place to go for wildlife safari.

Witness real wilderness in the jungles of Chitwan: go for a jeep safari in the depths of the forest or ride a silent canoe and catch wildlife by surprise. Go for a jungle walk accompanied by an experienced guide who knows the jungle like the back of his hand.

Chitwan National Park

Along the marshes and rivers you will find gharial and marsh mugger crocodiles basking in the sun. These reptiles spend a lot of time lying still on the sandy banks giving you plenty of time to watch them.

You can also spend some quality time visiting the elephant and gharial breeding centers, a perfect way to educate your kids about these animals and their life cycle.

Observe local tribal life by visiting a Tharu village, where you will be welcomed inside their traditional mud houses and treated as valued guests.

At the end of the day add to the essence of the ultimate jungle experience by unwinding next to a large campfire, watching the mesmerizing Tharu stick dance and listening to their soothing folk songs.

Tharu Cultural Dance

The Chitwan National Park is Nepal’s first national park and lies at the foot of the Mahabharat range in the inner Tarai lowlands of Chitwan. Covering an area of 932 sq. km this is the most well preserved conservation area in all of Asia.

This national park has a fascinating variety of mammals, reptiles and birds and preserves some of the last habitats for endangered species like the Greater one-horned rhinoceros and the Royal Bengal tiger.

The reserve was designated a national park in 1973 and was listed as a UNESCO world Heritage site.

Climate

The park has a range of climatic seasons each offering unique experience. October through February with average temperature of 25C offers an enjoyable climate. From March to June temperatures can reach as high as 43*C. The hot humid days give way to the monsoon season that typically lasts from late June until September when rivers become flooded and most of the roads are virtually impassable. Mean annual rainfall of the park has been recorded 2150mm.

In late January, local villagers are allowed to cut thatch grasses to meet their needs, which offer a better viewing of wildlife to visitors. Also, between September and November, and February and April, migratory birds join the residential birds and create spectacular bird watching opportunities. While the monsoon rains bring lush vegetation, most trees flower in late winter. The palash tree, known as the “flame of the forest”, and silk cotton tree have spectacular crimson flowers that can be seen from a distance.

Rules and Regulations

There are certain rules and regulations of the Chitwan National Park that the visitors of the park are supposed to follow in order to visit the park. The regulations of the park are outlined here below:

  1. An entry fee of NRs. 1500/- (Foreigners), NRs. 750/- (SAARC), and NRs. 100/- (Nepalese) per person has to be paid at the Park’s Entrance Gate.
  2. Flora and Fauna of the park are fully protected and must not be disturbed at any cost.
  3. Do not purchase illegal animal or plant products. The purchase of illegal animal or plant product may bring you to the legal prosecution.
  4. The visitors of the park must respect the religious and cultural sites all around the park.
  5. The visitors are required to place the trash in the rubbish bins and should care about the cleanlliness.
  6. The visitors are strictly prohibited to walk within the park between sunset and sunrise.
Also Read Sagarmatha National Park

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